© 2018 by MARY CATHERINE BROUDER

“You write in order to change the world ... if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way people look at reality, then you can change it.” 
                                                                                                                       ― James Baldwin 

Thriving After Tragedy

 

When Rev. Vincent Fusco came to assess the damage at Coney Island Lighthouse Community Kitchen after Superstorm Sandy hit, his heart sank. “In a word, it was totalled. Totally and completely wiped out.”

 

Fusco is CEO of Coney Island Lighthouse Community Kitchen, which serves hot meals to hundreds of members of the surrounding community every week through both its onsite and mobile kitchens, along with hosting programs and courses for those in need.

 

After estimating that the building incurred a staggering $150,000 in damages from Superstorm Sandy, Rev. Fusco wasn’t sure whether the food pantry would become a casualty, or a survivor, of the storm. “When Sandy hit, we thought, this may be the end,” said Fusco.

On Finding Love and Yeats in Ireland 

Still don’t know what Love means,

Still don’t know what Love means.

It’s the refrain from a a song called "Jolene" by Ray Lamontagne, one of my all-time favorite artists.

Does any one of us know what Love is? 

Is it in the softness of another’s touch? Or in the music of a child’s most perfect, innocent laughter? Is it blowing in the wind; in the kiss of a passing breeze that tickles your eyelashes before it departs, as quickly as it came? Maybe it’s in a stranger’s helping hand, or even, in that sad little man who’s always curled up and confused inside Francis Bacon’s paintings. 

Album Review: Adam Sandler "Shh... Don't Tell" 

 

With his new album, Shh...Don’t Tell, Adam Sandler logs another entry in his collection of notoriously crude comedy albums, leaving caution and any semblance of political correctness to the wind. Despite the vulgarity and apparent immaturity of the tracks on this jam-packed album, which features thirteen joke sketches and seven innocuously amusing songs, you’ve got to give Sandler a morsel of credit for releasing a somewhat offensive string of impolite tracks in this day and age of FCC crackdown and Howard Stern censorship.